RMR Summer Selections

Hi everyone – I hope you’re enjoying your summer so far.  I’ve selected four titles for you to consider for summer reading.  There will not be an RMR gathering this summer because of my schedule, but I hope you’ll pick up one or more of these titles and enjoy the stories.  Why?  Because REAL MEN READ!


Sold
by Patricia McCormick

Lakshmi is a thirteen-year-old girl who lives with her family in a small hut on a mountain in Nepal. Though she is desperately poor, her life is full of simple pleasures, like playing hopscotch with her best friend from school, and having her mother brush her hair by the light of an oil lamp. But when the harsh Himalayan monsoons wash away all that remains of the family’s crops, Lakshmi’s stepfather says she must leave home and take a job to support her family.

He introduces her to a glamorous stranger who tells her she will find her a job as a maid in the city. Glad to be able to help, Lakshmi journeys to India and arrives at “Happiness House” full of hope. But she soon learns the unthinkable truth: she has been sold into prostitution.

An old woman named Mumtaz rules the brothel with cruelty and cunning. She tells Lakshmi that she is trapped there until she can pay off her family’s debt—then cheats Lakshmi of her meager earnings so that she can never leave.

Lakshmi’s life becomes a nightmare from which she cannot escape. Still, she lives by her mother’s words—Simply to endure is to triumph—and gradually, she forms friendships with the other girls that enable her to survive in this terrifying new world. Then the day comes when she must make a decision—will she risk everything for a chance to reclaim her life?

Written in spare and evocative vignettes, this powerful novel renders a world that is as unimaginable as it is real, and a girl who not only survives but triumphs. (from BN.com)

Skyship Academy: The Pearl Wars by Nick James

“A definite must-read!”—JAMES DASHNER, New York Times bestselling author of The Maze Runner

A devastated Earth’s last hope is found in Pearls: small, mysterious orbs that fall from space and are capable of supplying enough energy to power entire cities. Battling to control the Pearls are the Skyship dwellers—political dissidents who live in massive ships in the Earth’s stratosphere—and the corrupt Surface government.

Jesse Fisher, a Skyship slacker, and Cassius Stevenson, a young Surface operative, cross paths when they both venture into forbidden territory in pursuit of Pearls. Their chance encounter triggers an unexpected reaction, endowing each boy with remarkable—and dangerous—abilities that their respective governments would stop at nothing to possess.

Enemies thrust together with a common goal, Jesse and Cassius make their way to the ruins of Seattle to uncover the truth about their new powers, the past they didn’t know they shared, and a shocking secret about the Pearls. (from BN.com)


Wings Over Persia
by Lt. Col. Lou Martin

WINGS OVER PERSIA provides a firsthand account of intrigue and adventure of an American pilot flying in Iran, during the revolution which overthrew the Shah and installed Ayatollah Khomeini as Iran’s Islamic dictator.
Lou Martin was an air force pilot for 22 years and a captain for Japan airlines from 1970 to 1975, before joining a small cadre of foreign pilots in Iran hired to fly a variety of aircraft throughout the Middle East.

His passengers ranged from family members of the late Shah of Iran to high-ranking Iranian government officials, and oil field roughnecks. His observations relating to these flights are outlined in thrilling chapter after chapter. He invites the reader to mentally share his cockpit during these exciting flights.

Captain Martin was living and working in Iran during the disturbing days of 1978 when Islamic hard-liners rioted in the streets of Tehran demanding the overthrow of the Shah.

The tempo of the revolution increased to the point where thousands of demonstrators were killed by the Shah’s army forcing him and his family to flee to Egypt. His abdication allowed the firebrand leader Ayatollah Khomeini to become Iran’s despotic leader, and form a ruthless fundamentalist Islamic government. Several of Captain Martin’s friends and colleagues were summarily tried and executed by the Islamic revolutionary guards.
During the peak of the revolution a personal friend was stabbed to death by unknown assailants, and fearing for his own life he hurriedly left Iran. His exodus forced him to abandon thousands of dollars of unpaid salary, a Volkswagen and other personal property.

In the spring of 1979 he was prepared toreturn to Iran in an attempt to recover lost property, but an extraordinarily lucky event in Rome, Italy, convinced him that returning to Iran would very likely expose him to arrest and confinement. Faced with this dismal probability he returned to the United States to pursue a safer and less exciting life. (from BN.com)

Feed by M. T. Anderson

So says Titus, a teenager whose ability to read, write, and even think for himself has been almost completelyobliterated by his “feed,” a transmitter implanted directly into his brain. Feeds are a crucial part of life for Titus and his friends. After all, how else would they know where to party on the moon, how to get bargains at Weatherbee & Crotch, or how to accessorize the mysterious lesions everyone’s been getting? But then Titus meets Violet, a girl who cares about what’s happening to the world and challenges everything Titus and his friends hold dear. A girl who decides to fight the feed.

In a future where most people have computer implants in their heads to control their environment, a boy meets an unusual girl who is in serious trouble.

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