Choose Our Next Book!

Please read a brief synopsis of the three titles we’re considering for our next book and then VOTE for you choice using the survey below…why?  Because REAL MEN READ!

9780451163516_p0_v1_s260x420The Man From St. Petersburg, by Ken Follett (historical fiction)

His name was Feliks. He came to London to commit a murder that would change history. A master manipulator, he had many weapons at his command, but against him were ranged the whole of the English police, a brilliant and powerful lord, and the young Winston Churchill himself…

1914: the world hangs on the brink of catastrophe–the eve of the war to end all wars. Feliks, a man consumed with a mission, comes to London to commit a murder that could change history. Against him are the whole of the English police, a powerful and brilliant lord–and the young Winston Churchill.

5582.outliers (1)Outliers, by Malcolm Gladwell (nonfiction)

In this stunning new book, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual journey through the world of “outliers”–the best and the brightest, the most famous and the most successful. He asks the question: what makes high-achievers different?

His answer is that we pay too much attention to what successful people are like, and too little attention to where they are from: that is, their culture, their family, their generation, and the idiosyncratic experiences of their upbringing. Along the way he explains the secrets of software billionaires, what it takes to be a great soccer player, why Asians are good at math, and what made the Beatles the greatest rock band.

1595555153_jpgRunning For My Life, by Lopez Lomong (autobiography)

Running for My Life is not a story about Africa or track and field athletics. It is about outrunning the devil and achieving the impossible faith, diligence, and the desire to give back. It is the American dream come true and a stark reminder that saving one can help to save thousands more.

Lopez Lomong chronicles his inspiring ascent from a barefoot lost boy of the Sudanese Civil War to a Nike sponsored athlete on the US Olympic Team. Though most of us fall somewhere between the catastrophic lows and dizzying highs of Lomong’s incredible life, every reader will find in his story the human spark to pursue dreams that might seem unthinkable, even from circumstances that might appear hopeless.

Select the Next RMR Title

Students – look at the titles, and read the synopsis of the books we’re considering for our next selection.  Please vote in the poll below for the book you’re most interested in reading.  Why?  Because, REAL MEN READ!

The Kykuit Bunker, by Steven Janke

It all starts with one phone call to the New York Times: an old man trying to secure his place in American history.

What follows sends a group of college students on a treasure hunt to find the secret vault of billionaire philanthropist John D. Rockefeller. No one suspects that, while the students are desperately searching for the treasure, the CIA is following them, hoping to catch up to the students in time to keep the real secret behind Rockefeller’s treasure out of the public eye.

The captivating mystery of The Kykuit Bunker seamlessly melds the lives of these disparate characters while maintaining their distinctive personal stories. Together the stories unfold and intertwine, as do the secrets they seek answers to.

Will the burdens of history be too much for the young “detectives”? Or will they successfully uncover the secrets no one ever dreamed would be revealed?

Through an awe-inspiring mix of fact and fiction, American history, and thrilling drama, author Steven Janke transports us to a world rich with appeal—and secrets. Whether a lover of history, or a lover of modern story-telling, you will find yourself drawn into the mysteries of The Kykuit Bunker. (from BN.com)

The Long Walk, by Stephen King

One hundred teenage boys participate in an annual walking contest called “The Long Walk,” which is the “national sport”. Each Walker must maintain a speed of at least four miles per hour; if he drops below that speed for 30 seconds, he receives a verbal warning (which can be erased by walking for one hour without being warned). If a Walker with three warnings slows down again, he is “ticketed.” The meaning of this term is intentionally kept vague at first, but it soon becomes clear that “buying a ticket” means to be shot dead by soldiers riding in half-tracks along the roadside. Walkers may be shot immediately for certain serious violations, such as trying to leave the road or attacking the half-track. The soldiers use electronic equipment to precisely determine a Walker’s speed.

The event is run by a character known as “The Major,” who is implied to have much power, stemming from a possible military or fascist state system. The Major appears at the beginning of the Walk to encourage the boys and start them on their way, and then occasionally thereafter. While the Walkers initially greet him with awe and respect, they eventually realize their admiration is misplaced and ridicule him in later appearances. (from Wikipedia)

Bleachers, by John Grisham

High school all-American Neely Crenshaw was probably the best quarterback ever to play for the legendary Messina Spartans. Fifteen years have gone by since those glory days, and Neely has come home to Messina to bury Coach Eddie Rake, the man who molded the Spartans into an unbeatable football dynasty.

Now, as Coach Rake’s “boys” sit in the bleachers waiting for the dimming field lights to signal his passing, they replay the old games, relive the old glories, and try to decide once and for all whether they love Eddie Rake—or hate him. For Neely Crenshaw, a man who must finally forgive his coach—and himself—before he can get on with life, the stakes are especially high.

Presents a novel about high school football in a small Texas town, a place in which football has become a religion. (from BN.com)

What Should We Read Next?

Students – look at the titles, and read the synopsis of the books we’re considering for our next selection.  Please vote in the poll below for the book you’re most interested in reading.  Why?  Because, REAL MEN READ!

The Maze Runner by James Dashner

Imagine waking up one day in total darkness, unsure of where you are and unable to remember anything about yourself except your first name. You’re in a bizarre place devoid of adults called the Glade. The Glade is an enclosed structure with a jail, a graveyard, a slaughterhouse, living quarters, and gardens. And no way out. Outside the Glade is the Maze, and every day some of the kids — the Runners — venture into the labyrinth, trying to map the ever-changing pattern of walls in an attempt to find an exit from this hellish place. So far, no one has figured it out. And not all of the Runners return from their daily exertions, victims of the maniacal Grievers, part animal, part mechanical killing machines.

Thomas is the newest arrival to the Glade in this Truman-meets-Lord of the Flies tale. A motley crew of half a dozen kids is all he has to guide him in this strange world. As soon as he arrives, unusual things begin to happen, and the others grow suspicious of him. Though the Maze seems somehow familiar to Thomas, he’s unable to make sense of the place, despite his extraordinary abilities as a Runner. What is this place, and does Thomas hold the key to finding a way out?

In The Maze Runner, Dashner has crafted a creative and engaging novel that’s both mysterious and thought provoking. (from BN.com)

 

Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien

In ancient times the Rings of Power were crafted by the Elven-smiths, and Sauron, the Dark Lord, forged the One Ring, filling it with his own power so that he could rule all others. But the One Ring was taken from him, and though he sought it throughout Middle-earth, it remained lost to him. After many ages, it fell by chance into the hands of the hobbit Bilbo Baggins.

From his fastness in the Dark Tower of Mordor, Sauron’s power spread far and wide. He gathered all the Great Rings to him, but always he searched for the One Ring that would complete his dominion.  On Bilbo’s eleventy-first birthday, he disappeared, bequeathing to his young cousin, Frodo, the Ruling Ring and a perilous quest: to journey across Middle-earth, deep into the shadow of the Dark Lord, and destroy the Ring by casting it into the Cracks of Doom.

The Lord of the Rings tells of the great quest undertaken by Frodo and the Fellowship of the Ring: Gandalf the Wizard; the hobbits Merry, Pippin, and Sam; Gimli the Dwarf; Legolas the Elf; Boromir of Gondor; and a tall, mysterious stranger called Strider.

Saga of a group heroes who set forth to save their world from evil. A brotherhood of ‘hobbits,’ elves, dwarves, and people is formed to combat evil forces. Tolkien drew on his extensive knowledge of folklore and the classics to create the worlds and creatures described in the trilogy, which includes The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, and The Return of the King. (from BN.com)

 

Elephant Run by Roland Smith

In 1941, bombs drop from the night skies of London, demolishing the apartment Nick Freestone lives in with his mother. Deciding the situation in England is too unstable, Nick’s mother sends him to live with his father in Burma, hoping he will be safer living on the family’s teak plantation.

But as soon as Nick arrives, trouble erupts in this remote Burmese elephant village. Japanese soldiers invade, and Nick’s father is taken prisoner. Nick is stranded on the plantation, forced to work as a servant to the new rulers. As life in the village grows more dangerous for Nick and his young friend, Mya, they plan their daring escape. Setting off on elephant back, they will risk their lives to save Nick’s father and Mya’s brother from a Japanese POW camp.

In this thrilling journey through the jungles of Burma, Roland Smith explores the far-reaching effects of World War II, while introducing readers to the fascinating world of wild timber elephants and their mahouts. (from BN.com)